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How Do I Store My Groceries?



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Posted by A C – How to store your groceries to prevent wasting all that healthy fruit and veg. Let’s chat about your nutrition http://ift.tt/15WgeSq Chris Hales, Herbalife Wellness Coach. #WeightLoss #WeightlossTips

When Should I Plant ……



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Posted by Amanda Poore – Thank you!!! @Donna Grastara Soo excited for our garden! Lol When to Plant?#HappyEarthDay Planting a garden:) #Weightloss

Craving this? Eat that! Decode Your Food Cravings!



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Posted by Melodie Dziduch – Craving this? Eat that! Ill be interested to see if this really works. 🙂 #Weightloss

249 Foods To Lose Weight Faster


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Posted by Victory Ink – 249 weight loss foods you should eat 80% of the time to lose weight faster #Weightloss

Healthy Anti Inflammatory Foods


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Posted by Mina Minetto – Healthy Anti inflammatory foods

If you want to eat for long-term health, lowering inflammation is crucial.

Inflammation in the body causes or contributes to many debilitating, chronic illnesses — including osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, heart disease,Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and even cancer.

That’s why, as a doctor and founder of the Kaplan Center for Integrative Medicine, I recommend my patients eat a diet focused on anti-inflammatory principles.

Recent research finds that eating this way not only helps protect against certain diseases, but it also slows the aging process by stabilizing blood sugar and increasing metabolism.

Plus, although the goal is to optimize health, many people find they also lose weight by following an anti-inflammatory eating pattern.

Here, I’m sharing the 11 principles I recommend everyone incorporate into their diet for optimal health:

1. Consume at least 25 grams of fiber every day.

A fiber-rich diet helps reduce inflammation by supplying naturally occurring anti-inflammatory phytonutrients found in fruits, vegetables, and other whole foods.


To get your fill of fiber, seek out whole grains, fruits, and vegetables. The best sources include whole grains such as barley and oatmeal; vegetables like okra, eggplant, and onions; and a variety of fruits like bananas (3 grams of fiber per banana) and blueberries (3.5 grams of fiber per cup).

2. Eat a minimum of nine servings of fruits and vegetables every day.

One “serving” is half a cup of a cooked fruit or vegetable, or one cup of a raw leafy vegetable.

For an extra punch, add anti-inflammatory herbs and spices — such asturmeric and ginger — to your cooked fruits and vegetables to increase their antioxidant capacity.

3. Eat four servings of both alliums and crucifers every week.

Alliums include garlic, scallions, onions, and leek, while crucifers refer to vegetables such as broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, mustard greens, and Brussels sprouts.

Because of their powerful antioxidant properties, consuming a weekly average of four servings of each can help lower your risk of cancer.

If you like the taste, I recommend eating a clove of garlic a day!

4. Limit saturated fat to 10 percent of your daily calories.

By keeping saturated fat low (that’s about 20 grams per 2,000 calories), you’ll help reduce the risk of heart disease.

You should also limit red meat to once per week and marinate it with herbs, spices, and tart, unsweetened fruit juices to reduce the toxic compoundsformed during cooking.

5. Consume foods rich in omega-3 fatty acids.

Research shows that omega-3 fatty acids reduce inflammation and may help lower risk of chronic diseases such as heart disease, cancer, and arthritis — conditions that often have a high inflammatory process at their root.

Aim to eat lots of foods high in omega-3 fatty acids like flax meal, walnuts, and beans such as navy, kidney and soy. I also recommend taking a good-quality omega-3 supplement.

And of course, consume cold-water fish such as salmon, oysters, herring, mackerel, trout, sardines, and anchovies. Speaking of which:

6. Eat fish at least three times a week.

Choose both low-fat fish such as sole and flounder, and cold-water fish that contain healthy fats, like the ones mentioned above.

7. Use oils that contain healthy fats.

The body requires fat, but choose the fats that provide you with benefits.

Virgin and extra-virgin olive oil and expeller-pressed canola are the best bets for anti-inflammatory benefits. Other options include high-oleic, expeller-pressed versions of sunflower and safflower oil.

8. Eat healthy snacks twice a day.

If you’re a snacker, aim for fruit, plain or unsweetened Greek-style yogurt (it contains more protein per serving), celery sticks, carrots, or nuts like pistachios, almonds, and walnuts.

9. Avoid processed foods and refined sugars.

This includes any food that contains high-fructose corn syrup or is high in sodium, which contribute to inflammation throughout the body.

Avoid refined sugars whenever possible and artificial sweeteners altogether. The dangers of excess fructose have been widely cited and include increased insulin resistance (which can lead to type-2 diabetes), raised uric acid levels,raised blood pressure, increased risk of fatty liver disease, and more.

10. Cut out trans fats.

In 2006, the FDA required food manufacturers to identify trans fats on nutrition labels, and for good reason — studies show that people who eat foods high in trans fats have higher levels of C-reactive protein, a biomarker for inflammation in the body.

A good rule of thumb is to always read labels and steer clear of products that contain the words “hydrogenated” or “partially hydrogenated oils.” Vegetable shortenings, select margarines, crackers, and cookies are just a few examples of foods that might contain trans fats.

11. Sweeten meals with phytonutrient-rich fruits, and flavor foods with spices.

Most fruits and vegetables are loaded with important phytonutrients. In order to naturally sweeten your meals, try adding apples, apricots, berries, and even carrots.

And for flavoring savory meals, go for spices that are known for their anti-inflammatory properties, including cloves, cinnamon, turmeric, rosemary, ginger, sage, and thyme.

Bon appétit!

No Need For A Detox Diet


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Posted by ANNETTE HAMLIN – Never need to do a detox diet if you incorporate these foods into your normal diet. corehealthcoaching.com.au #Weightloss #Detox

Detoxing your body can do more for your body than just put a glow on your face or help you shed some pounds. The main purpose of following a detox diet is to take the load off organs that detoxify your body and help them function better.
Following a detox diet also prevents chronic diseases, enhances the function of your immune system, slows premature aging, provides mental and emotional clarity, and increases energy. Moreover, eliminating toxins and feeding your body healthy nutrients isn’t difficult!
If you’re ready to begin detoxing your body, here are ten foods you should include in your diet.

Heart Cleansers
#1 Wild Salmon
Salmon is rich in omega-3 fatty acids which help protect the heart and reduce triglyceride levels in the blood. These anti-inflammatory healthy fats are also known to reverse arterial stiffness, which is a common side-effect of smoking.

#2 Spinach
This leafy vegetable is an essential detox food your heart. Spinach is rich in vitamins A and C- both antioxidants that fight free radicals in the body, thereby keeping cholesterol levels in check. Spinach also has folate which keeps the cardiovascular system healthy and magnesium that helps lower blood pressure.

Liver Cleansers
#3 Lemon
Being a citrus fruit, lemons are loaded with vitamin C, which is essential to the body in several ways. Among other uses, vitamin C is needed to make glutathione- a powerful antioxidant that detoxifies the liver, in addition to enhancing the immune system and neutralizing free radicals. Lemon also increases the production of bile which is necessary for digestion. At the same time, lemon juice controls the flow of excess bile into the digestive tract, thereby preventing the formation of ulcers. Further, drinking lemon infused water or lemon juice first thing in the morning balances out the acidity of foods consumed the previous day. Lemon juice contains anti-cancer compounds and helps maintain the body’s pH levels too.


#4 Artichokes
This wonder vegetable, which is actually a flower bud, helps the liver function at its best by promoting the production of bile. Artichokes are also able to protect the liver owing to the presence of silymarin- a phenol compound. In addition, artichoke leaves are rich in anti-cancer polyphenols and also have anti-viral and anti-fungal properties.

Kidney Cleansers
#5 Kale
Kale is packed with antioxidants and has anti-inflammatory properties, which is why it is highly recommended by doctors to patients with kidney-related diseases. In addition to flushing out kidneys, kale also is a nutrient-dense food, so you should eat it as often as you can.

#6 Basil
This full-of-flavor herb is a great addition to soups, salads, grilled vegetables, and a lot other dishes. What’s more, it is rich in antioxidants and has anti-bacterial properties! Basil also expels unwanted toxins out of the body by supporting the functioning of the kidneys and acting as a diuretic.

Digestive System Cleansers
#7 Whole Grains
Whole grains such as brown and wild rice, quinoa, and steel-cut oats are complex carbohydrates that are rich in soluble as well as insoluble fiber. The high fiber content ensures regular bowel movement, thereby helping you eliminate body waste efficiently. Apart from this, fiber-rich grains also reduce the risk of colon cancer, and gastrointestinal disorders like duodenal ulcers, irritable bowel syndrome, reflux, and diverticulitis.

#8 Fresh Fruits
Fresh fruits are among the most effective foods that can cleanse your digestive system. That’s because almost all fruits contain ample amounts of fiber that aids digestion. Fresh fruits are also rich in essential vitamins, minerals, and other compounds that can nourish the body and help detoxify it. Some fruits that are great cleansers are apples, blueberries, cranberries, avocado, and grapefruit.

Overall Body Cleansers
#9 Beetroot
A single serving of this delicious root vegetable can work wonders for your whole body. Beetroots contain abundant phytochemicals and minerals that help fight infection, purify the blood, and cleanse vital organs. They also boost the body’s intake of oxygen at the cellular level, making them an excellent overall body cleanser. Additionally, eating beetroots regularly can help fight cancer, boost the functioning of the brain, reduce arthritic pain, and more.

#10 Cabbage
This cruciferous vegetable helps cleans the liver and also acts as a diuretic, flushing toxins out of your body. Cabbages also contain sulfur that helps break down toxins so that they can be eliminated easily.

Conclusion
Now that you know about these ten amazing detox foods, what are you waiting for? Get started on your detox diet right away! Just make sure you don’t follow fads blindly; a detox diet will benefit you only if you do it right. So eat healthy, take your detox diet slow at first, and you’re sure to bring the balance back into your life by helping your body function as well as it can.

The Amazing Health Benefits of Blueberries!


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Posted by Alison Woolhouse – #Health Benefits of #Blueberries #Weightloss

Fresh blueberries are one of the most popular summer treats of all time. They are sweet, succulent, full of nutrients, and can be eaten freshly picked as well as incorporated into a variety of recipes.

Blueberries contain a type of flavonoid known as anthocyanins, which are responsible for giving foods like blueberries, cranberries, red cabbage and eggplants their iconic deep red, purple and blue hues. Anthocyanins are responsible for more than just the blueberry’s pretty blue color – they also contribute to the popular fruit’s numerous health benefits.

This MNT Knowledge Center feature is part of a collection of articles on the health benefits of popular foods. It provides a nutritional breakdown of the blueberry and an in-depth look at its possible health benefits, how to incorporate more blueberries into your diet and any potential health risks of consuming blueberries.

One cup of fresh blueberries contains 84 calories, 0 grams of cholesterol, 1.1 grams of protein, 0.49 grams of fat, 21 grams of carbohydrate and 3.6 grams of dietary fiber (14% of daily requirements).

That same one-cup serving provides 24% of daily vitamin C, 5% vitamin of B6 and 36% of vitamin K needs. Blueberries also provide iron, calcium, potassium, magnesium, phosphorus, sodium, manganese, zinc, copper, folate,beta-carotene, folate, choline, vitamin A and vitamin E.

In addition to anthocyanins, blueberries contain a diverse range of phenolic compounds such as quercetin, kaempferol, myricetin and chlorogenic acid – all of which contribute to their antioxidant capacity.

Due to these large amounts of bioactive compounds, blueberries rank very highly on the Aggregate Nutrient Density Index (ANDI), which rates foods based on their vitamin and mineral content, phytochemical composition and antioxidant capacity. Foods that have the most nutrients per calorie have the highest rankings, and blueberries score among the top 20 fruits and vegetables.


Possible health benefits of blueberries

Consuming fruits and vegetables of all kinds has long been associated with a reduced risk of many lifestyle-related health conditions. Many studies have suggested that increasing consumption of plant foods like blueberries decreases the risk of obesity, diabetes, heart disease and overall mortality while promoting a healthy complexion and hair, increased energy, and overall lower weight.

Maintaining healthy bones

The iron, phosphorous, calcium, magnesium, manganese, zinc and vitamin K in blueberries all contribute to building and maintaining bone structure and strength.

Iron and zinc play crucial roles in maintaining the strength and elasticity of bones and joints. Low intakes of vitamin K have been associated with a higher risk for bone fracture, while adequate vitamin K intakes improve calcium absorption and may reduce calcium loss.5

Lowering blood pressure

Maintaining a low sodium intake is essential to lowering blood pressure. Blueberries are naturally free of sodium and contain potassium, calcium, and magnesium, all of which have been found to decrease blood pressure naturally.3

Managing diabetes

Studies have shown that type 1 diabetics who consume high-fiber diets have lower blood glucose levels and type 2 diabetics may have improved blood sugar, lipids and insulin levels. One cup of blueberries contributes 3.6 grams of fiber.

The Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends 21-25 grams of fiber per day for women and 30-38 grams per day for men.

Warding off heart disease

The blueberry’s fiber, potassium, folate, vitamin C, vitamin B6 and phytonutrient content, coupled with its lack of cholesterol, all support heart health. The fiber in blueberries helps lower the total amount of cholesterol in the blood and decrease the risk of heart disease.

Vitamin B6 and folate prevent the buildup of a compound known as homocysteine. When excessive amounts of homocysteine accumulate in the body, it can damage blood vessels and lead to heart problems.

According to a recent study from the Harvard School of Public Health and the University of East Anglia, regular consumption of anthocyanins can reduce the risk of heart attack by 32% in young and middle-aged women. The study, which was led by nutrition professor Aedin Cassidy, PhD, MSc, BSc, found that women who consumed at least three servings of blueberries or strawberries, showed the best results.

Preventing cancer

Vitamin C, vitamin A, and various phytonutrients in blueberries function as powerful antioxidants that help protect cells against free radical damage. They inhibit tumor growth, decrease inflammation in the body and help ward off or slow several types of cancer, including esophageal, lung, mouth, pharynx, endometrial, pancreatic, prostate and colon.1

Blueberries also contain folate, which plays a role in DNA synthesis and repair, thus preventing the formation of cancer cells from mutations in the DNA.1

Improving mental health

Population-based studies have shown that consumption of blueberries can reduce the risk of cognitive decline as well as Parkinson’s disease – a neurodegenerative disorder resulting from cell death in parts of the brain.

Studies have also revealed that in addition to reducing the risk of cognitive damage, blueberries can also improve short-term memory loss and motor coordination.4

Healthy digestion

Because of their fiber content, blueberries help to prevent constipation and promote regularity for a healthy digestive tract.

Weight loss and satiety

Dietary fiber is commonly recognized as an important factor in weight loss and weight management by functioning as a “bulking agent” in the digestive system. High fiber foods increase satiety and reduce appetite, making you feel fuller for longer and thereby lowering your overall calorie intake.

Fighting wrinkles

Collagen, the skin’s support system, relies on vitamin C as an essential nutrient that works in our bodies as an antioxidant to help prevent damage caused by the sun, pollution and smoke. Vitamin C also promotes collagen’s ability to smooth wrinkles and improve overall skin texture. Just one cup of blueberries provides 24% of your daily need for vitamin C.

How to incorporate more blueberries into your diet

Blueberries are available fresh, frozen, freeze dried and in jellies, syrups and jams. Make sure to check the label of frozen and dried blueberries for added sugars. When looking for jellies or jams, go for all fruit spreads without the added sweeteners and fillers.

Quick tips:

  • Use blueberries as fresh toppings on oatmeal, waffles, pancakes, yogurt or cereal for an extra burst of flavor in your breakfast
  • Whip up a quick and easy smoothie using frozen berries, low-fat milk and yogurt
  • Mix fresh or dried blueberries into a spinach salad with walnuts and feta cheese
  • Fold them into muffins and sweet breads or blend them in a food processor with a little water and use as a fresh syrup to top desserts or breakfast foods.

Potential health risks of consuming blueberries

If you are taking blood-thinners such as Coumadin (warfarin), it is important that you do not suddenly begin to eat more or less foods containing vitamin K, which plays a large role in blood clotting.

It is the total diet or overall eating pattern that is most important in disease prevention and achieving good health. It is better to eat a diet with a variety than to concentrate on individual foods as the key to good health.

Written by Megan Ware RDN LD

and Helen Yuan, nutrition intern

 

Which Detox For Which Body Part?


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Posted by ClĂ©mentine M. – detox your body by eating the right foods #weightloss #detox #healthyeating

Why Am I Eating Green Anyway?


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Posted by Ally Love – The Benefits of Going Green. Learn about the health benefits of various greens. http://ift.tt/1KqpRLE #Diet #Nutrition #Weightloss