Archives

13 Steps To Perfect Paleo!



https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/d6/cf/0f/d6cf0f4cf92dce590ce768fe2493cb3b.jpg

Posted by Erin Herner – Paleo Diet

I recently read a “30 Tips” post on Rubies and Radishes that had some great suggestions to make eating Paleo easier.*

But… compulsive editor that I am, I edited it down to what I thought were the best tips for eating Paleo, and add a few helpful items and notes of my own. Here you go!

• When you’re just starting, plan out meals and snacks several days in advance. This keeps you from caving in on busy days. Once you get the hang of cooking and eating Paleo, it will be easier to throw together meals from your well-stocked kitchen.

• If planning all your meals seems overwhelming, try it in phases. Most people don’t need a lot of variety in breakfast, so find one or two Paleo-friendly breakfasts that work for you and get those nailed down. Then find a few lunches that work for you.  Then move on to planning dinners.


• Cook meat in bulk; save in easy-to-thaw portions in the freezer. Hamburger, pulled pork, chicken, and your favorite kinds of sausage are all handy to have ready to deploy. You can also cook bacon in big batches and keep it in the fridge. Have you tried cooking it in the oven?

• Dedicate time to prep ingredients every week. Or, if it works better for you, every evening after dinner, prep what you’ll need for tomorrow’s meal(s). Thaw anything that’s frozen. Chop up ingredients. Pre-mix seasonings or sauces.

• Paleo eating and meal planning takes time to adjust to. Give yourself time and grace. Keep at it — it will get easier! It’s only hard until it’s routine.

• Read labels. Learn to recognize sugar in all its disguises. Yeah, it’s overwhelming and kind of depressing at first, but it’s a necessary education.

•  Don’t spend too much time trying to figure out how to substitute or recreate the non-Paleo food you once ate. Instead of mourning the loss of food that makes you feel yucky, celebrate new food discoveries that make you feel great! As you stick with this, your taste buds will change and junk food will become less and less appealing.

•  Explore Paleo blogs and books. The more Paleo knowledge you have, the easier it is to stick with your new lifestyle!

•  When you make dinner, make extra. Enjoy it for breakfast (yes, you can!) or lunch the next day, or pack it in the freezer for an easy future meal.

•  One of the hardest things about eating Paleo is the social pressure to eat junk. Always have a plan before going to social gatherings. And focus on how that food is going to make you feel tomorrow! Tell yourself, “When I eat crap, I feel like crap.”

•  Eat a satisfying meal before you go to parties so you won’t be tempted by unhealthy choices. Drink plenty of water while you’re there. Focus on enjoying the people, not the food.

•  If it’s a pot luck, bring your own Paleo dish (or two), because that might be your only healthy choice!

•  Likewise, have a plan for how you’ll eat when meeting friends at restaurants.

•  Remember to get the sleep you need every night, and drink plenty of water. And several times a week, if not every day, try to get a little sunshine and gentle exercise.

10 Signs You Have An Iron Deficiency


The Different Iron Deficiency Symptoms

https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/564x/2b/40/62/2b406272f541c013343fdcff89c64061.jp
g
Posted by Crisha Alyziah Miller -When you have iron-deficiency, your cells can’t get enough oxygen. How can you tell if your levels are a little low? Be on the lookout for these 10 warning signs.

Iron is crucial to biologic functions, including respiration, energy production, DNA synthesis, and cell proliferation. Although the prevalence of iron-deficiency anemia has declined somewhat recently, iron deficiency continues to be the top-ranking cause of anemia worldwide.

The human body has evolved to conserve iron in several ways, including the recycling of iron after the breakdown of red cells and the retention of iron in the absence of an excretion mechanism.

However, since excess levels of iron can be toxic, its absorption is limited to 1 to 2 mg daily, and most of the iron in the body (about 25 mg per day) is recycled by macrophages that phagocytose senescent erythrocytes. The latter two mechanisms are controlled by the hormone hepcidin, which maintains total-body iron within normal range, avoiding both iron deficiency and excess.

Hepcidin is a peptide hormone that is synthesized primarily in the liver. It functions as an acute-phase reactant that adjusts fluctuations in plasma iron levels by binding to and inducing the degradation of ferroportin, which exports iron from cells. In iron deficiency, the transcription of hepcidin is suppressed. This adaptive mechanism facilitates the absorption of iron and the release of iron from body stores.

In most cases, iron resistance is due to disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. Partial or total gastrectomy or any surgical procedure that bypasses the duodenum can cause resistance to oral iron. Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, which is performed in selected obese patients to reduce caloric intake and to correct diabetes, is an emerging cause of iron deficiency and anemia because the procedure effectively removes an active iron absorption site from the digestive process and increases gastric pH. Helicobacter pylori infection decreases iron absorption because the microorganism competes with its human host for available iron, reduces the bioavailability of vitamin C, and may lead to microerosions that cause bleeding. Since it is estimated that half the world’s population is infected with H. pylori, clinicians should be aware of the possibility of infection and provide treatment in order to eradicate this source of iron-resistant iron-deficiency anemia.


Patients with malabsorption and genetic iron-refractory iron-deficiency anemia may require intravenous iron. Intravenous administration is also preferred when a rapid increase in hemoglobin level is required or when iron-deficiency anemia caused by chronic blood loss cannot be controlled with the use of oral iron, as is the case in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. Active inflammatory bowel disease is an emerging indication for the use of intravenous iron; oral iron is not only ineffective but may also increase local inflammation. Intravenous iron is essential in the management of anemia in patients with chronic kidney disease who are receiving dialysis and treatment with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents.

Top 10 Superfoods!



https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/5d/0f/4c/5d0f4c1865dfd437cba0e00e7b189c90.jpg

Posted by Victory Ink – Top Ten Superfoods for exceptional health! #weightloss #superfoods #nutrition

Coconut Oil for Health, Weight Loss, Healing And Beauty!

Coconut Oil
http://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/1c/8a/fd/1c8afd0ab4b9ceca156a00b8db6e2827.jpg

Posted by Keto Grandma – Coconut Oil for Health, Weight Loss, Healing, beauty and SO much more! http://www.draxe.com #coconut #coconutoil #burnfat #loseweight #metabolism #health

Why Are Mangoes Good For You?


http://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/91/bd/24/91bd24bc44119c9d845352cc95ca4fea.jpg

Posted by Caitlin Cobb – Mangoes Health Benefits: Have a look at these 8 amazing health benefits of mangoes. #Weightloss #Mangoes

Your Health: Coffee Vs Tea


http://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/d8/f6/e7/d8f6e743e23f519d76b522f34b105ae5.jpg

Posted by Natasha Honegger – Tea Health Benefits #Weightloss #Nutrition